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Equipment Review: Best Carbon-Steel Chef's Knives & Our Testing Winner

Best carbon-steel knife: http://amzn.to/1NpLCq1
Best stainless-steel knife: http://amzn.to/1vDJeHc

Full review and results chart: http://bit.ly/1rJ0KXN

Carbon-steel enthusiasts have long considered these knives sharper and more durable than stainless. But do they really perform better—and are they worth the upkeep?

We tested 8 carbon-steel knives to find the best one:
Bob Kramer 8″ Carbon Steel Chef’s Knife by Zwilling J.A. Henckels
Tsukiji Masamoto Gyuto, 8 1/4″
Togiharu Virgin Carbon Steel Gyutou, 8.2″
Misono Swedish Carbon Steel Gyutou, 8.2″
Masamoto Sohonten Virgin Carbon Steel Gyutou, 8.2″
Messermeister Park Plaza Carbon 8 Inch Chef’s Knife
R. Murphy Chef’s Select 8 Inch Carbon Steel Chef’s Knife
Sabatier Mexeur et Cie 8″ Chef

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29 replies on “Equipment Review: Best Carbon-Steel Chef's Knives & Our Testing Winner”

Pay too much for a knife and you lose it, or it gets messed up somehow. Pay forty bucks for a victorianox and you love it.

Victorinox?!?! really? the most hated blade in any professional star kitchen.It is way to soft to be considered a workhorse. We use the one promo'd for guests to use as a cake knife…as that's how dull it is, sharp enough for cake though ,lol. May I say ,the rest of the vid was spot on with great info as well of knowledge, Keep up the work

Victorinox?!?! really? the most hated blade in any professional star kitchen.It is way to soft to be considered a workhorse. We use the one promo'd for guests to use as a cake knife…as that's how dull it is, sharp enough for cake though ,lol. May I say ,the rest of the vid was spot on with great info as well of knowledge, Keep up the work

How can you compare cheap plastic handle Victorinox knife, with Kramer full tang premium knife, it is inadequate. There are plenty of inexpensive quality knives which I never seen in your reviews, because you prefer most known brands. Your comparisons doesn't makes sense.

There are some amazing powdered HSS’s and SS’s out there these days that far outperform VG-10. Big in the pocket knife world but not yet commonly seen in kitchen knives. CPM S30V, S35V, M390/204P/20CV, M4, CTS XHP, Maxamet (which can achieve over 70 rockwell and shave aluminum rods).

The victorinox is the best bang for your buck. Has been my go to in my kitchen for several years.

The Old Hickory Cooks Knife at $22 should have been tested here. At that price and American made it would have been interesting to see how it matches up.

I’m a pro sharpener, this is the second multi knife test that used expensive viewing technologies to look at edges. Both videos, just for fun “ tried a Victornox at the end. And both videos stated it’s a solid low cost alternative. I wonder who funded the expense of the microscope?
Don’t get me wrong Victornox is a great thin knife that never has problems. But also carries zero tool satisfaction.

Own a set of carbon steel Chicago Cutlery that’s 30 years old. Slice, dice, cut, pair, impeccably. Received a set of stainless steel Henckel knives a decade ago. Used for a week. Boxed up put them in a cupboard. Still there sitting unused. Over priced. Didn’t hold an edge for many uses.

Found a way to solve the problem of large chromium carbides? Its called particulate metallurgy. Instead of melting down chunks of metal and blending them the metal is turned to powder and melted. Very over simplified but you get the idea. Great presentation. Thank you.

At least you didn't smack the edge several times on the board before using it like Gordon Ramsey does, drives me nuts

I got a Ka Bar carbon steel knife that is at least 70-80 years old. I would not part with it for anything, stainless or not. Yeah I got keep it dry, but boy does it keep an edge. When I’ve wield my sister-in-laws knife; see I’m the official “Holiday Turkey Dinner Carver.” it makes me cringe with how badly the shiny fancy handled department store stuff cuts.

I purchased a K Sabatier knife a while back and it's ok. Not brilliant. Wish I had waited and spent more on a better one.

The question however is how do they "resharpen?" Trying to sharpen a stainless steel knife is hard indeed. What say you?

So.. the runner-up carbon steel blade mentioned in the video is Togiharu Virgin Carbon Steel Gyutou, 8.2" (from Korin), but the image corresponding to that section is of the Masamoto Sohonten Virgin Carbon Steel Gyutou, 8.2" (also available from Korin)… was there a little mix-up? The Masamoto is over double the price of the Togiharu.. just curious. Good video otherwise.

Rockwell hardness is not a measure of the strength of the steel. It's only an indicator (not a guarantor) of the resilience of the knife's edge. A properly ground and heat treated knife will have an edge that lasts longer at a higher hardness rating. And even that is a gross oversimplification of it.

The brand name of the Swiss knife it is not Victornox but Victorinox. Too dumb to pronounce the name correctly?

No wonder the Sabatier performs that badly. The advantage of a non-stainless blade is that it can be hardened to a higher degree and ground thinner, so it's sharper and stays that way for longer. But therefore you actually need to harden it to 60 HRc+ to have that advantage. If you harden it to only 54 HRc like Sabatier, you totally missed the point.

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